AACR: Broadening tumor spectrum in Lynch syndrome: increased incidence for 15 distinct cancer types (note ovarian) Ovarian Cancer and Us OVARIAN CANCER and US Ovarian Cancer and Us

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Sunday, April 17, 2016

AACR: Broadening tumor spectrum in Lynch syndrome: increased incidence for 15 distinct cancer types (note ovarian)



OASIS

Presentation Abstract
Abstract Number: 5216
Presentation Title: Broadening tumor spectrum in Lynch syndrome: increased incidence for 15 distinct cancer types
Presentation Time: Wednesday, Apr 20, 2016, 7:30 AM -11:00 AM
Location: Section 34
Poster Board Number: 12
Author Block: Christina Therkildsen, Steen Ladelund, Lars Joachim Lindberg, Lars Smith-Hansen, Mef Nilbert. Hvidovre Hospital, Hvidovre, Denmark
Abstract Body: Introduction: Lynch syndrome is a multi-tumor syndrome predominantly associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer, but is indeed linked to a yet uncertain number of extra-colonic tumor types.
Methods: In order to determine the risk for extra-colonic tumors in Lynch syndrome, we determined the incidence rates for 21 distinct malignancies in the national Danish Lynch syndrome cohort compared to an age-and sex matched control cohort from the Danish population.
Results: Based on data from 1494 Lynch syndrome mutation carriers, significantly increased risks were demonstrated for 15 cancer types. These included Lynch syndrome-related malignancies, such as cancer of the endometrium, the ovary, the small bowel, the urinary tract and brain tumors as well as tumor types with an undefined role in Lynch syndrome, such as breast cancer, gastric cancer, pancreatic cancer, skin cancer, prostate cancer, lung cancer, kidney cancer, and testicular cancer. Distinctive peak ages were defined with the highest incidence rate ratio at age 30-49 years for ovarian cancer and 50-69 years for endometrial cancer, breast cancer, and brain tumors to continuously increasing incidence rate ratios with increasing age for e.g. urothelial cancer, gastric cancer, pancreatic cancer and skin cancer.
Conclusion: The broad tumor spectrum in Lynch syndrome is of relevance to consider during genetic counseling, whereas the variable peak incidence ages provide a basis for precision surveillance programs that consider the different risks throughout life.

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