Quantitative evaluation of an information leaflet to increase prompt help-seeking for gyn cancer symptoms Ovarian Cancer and Us OVARIAN CANCER and US Ovarian Cancer and Us

Blog Archives: Nov 2004 - present

#ovariancancers



Special items: Ovarian Cancer and Us blog best viewed in Firefox

Search This Blog

Sunday, May 08, 2016

Quantitative evaluation of an information leaflet to increase prompt help-seeking for gyn cancer symptoms



(UK) Quantitative evaluation of an information leaflet to increase prompt help-seeking for gynaecological cancer symptoms | BMC Public Health | Full Text

 Due to the progressive nature of cancer, much effort has been put into understanding what contributes to a shorter patient interval – the time taken for an individual to notice and interpret a new symptom as worthy of medical attention and to seek medical advice [8]. Shorter patient intervals could lead to earlier-stage diagnoses and improved survival [9, 10]. Studies of women’s levels of awareness of gynaecological cancer symptoms show that free recall of symptoms is low and, although prompted recognition is higher, most women still do not recognise all symptoms [11, 12, 13]. Furthermore some symptoms (e.g., abdominal pain) are well-recognised by women as important, while others (e.g., feeling full quickly and difficulty eating) are less well-known as possible symptoms of ovarian cancer [12]. When women experience these symptoms, they typically attribute them to benign causes rather than cancer [14], and may not seek a medical opinion promptly.

Conclusions

When developing written information aimed at changing behaviour, it is essential to carry out thorough testing in the target population to demonstrate the impact of the intervention on behavioural intention, and to understand the mechanism for that impact. This study shows that useful information can be gathered through the under-used step of quantitative evaluation of a leaflet and as such indicates a method through which more effective patient information documents could be created. Improving rates of early diagnosis of cancer in the UK depends, in part, on ensuring the patient interval is kept as brief as possible. This study has shown that, as a minimum, intentions to seek help for gynaecological cancer symptoms can be improved through information leaflets which also address barriers to help-seeking and provide a tool with which the woman can approach her GP.

Efforts should now be focussed on trialling the leaflet in primary care settings and assessing its impact on help-seeking behaviours in the real world.

0 comments :

Post a Comment

Your comments?