Cancer and treatment-related symptoms are associated with mobility disability in women with ovarian cancer Ovarian Cancer and Us OVARIAN CANCER and US Ovarian Cancer and Us

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Sunday, September 18, 2016

Cancer and treatment-related symptoms are associated with mobility disability in women with ovarian cancer



abstract:
Cancer and treatment-related symptoms are associated with mobility disability in women with ovarian cancer: A cross-sectional study
  

Highlights

Mobility disability is endorsed by over half of women with ovarian cancer.
Poor appetite, bloating, fatigue, pain, numbness correlate with disability.
Clinicians should assess for mobility disability in women with ovarian cancer.

Objective

To examine the prevalence of symptom-related mobility disability and identify specific symptoms and other factors associated with mobility disability among a national sample of ovarian cancer (OC) survivors.

Methods

Descriptive, correlational secondary analysis of a National Ovarian Cancer Coalition mailed survey of women with a history of OC (n = 713). We used the Symptom Representation Questionnaire (SRQ), the MD Anderson Symptom Inventory (MDASI) Interference Scale, and medical and demographic information to determine prevalence of symptom-related mobility disability. We constructed a multiple linear regression model to determine the relative contributions of specific symptoms and other factors to mobility disability.

Results

A majority of the sample (60.0%) reported symptom-related mobility disability. Independent predictors included: > one comorbidity, active OC, abdominal bloating, fatigue, lack of appetite, numbness/tingling, and pain. The model explained 41.5% of the variance in symptom-related mobility disability. Unexpectedly, age and current chemotherapy were not significant predictors.

Conclusions

Symptom-related mobility disability is common among women with OC and is associated with medical comorbidities, abdominal bloating, fatigue, lack of appetite, numbness/tingling, and pain. Longitudinal research should clarify the relationship of these symptoms to mobility disability and determine whether effective symptom management minimizes disability.

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