Reporting of Adverse Events in Published and Unpublished Studies of Health Care Interventions: A Systematic Review Ovarian Cancer and Us OVARIAN CANCER and US Ovarian Cancer and Us

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Wednesday, September 21, 2016

Reporting of Adverse Events in Published and Unpublished Studies of Health Care Interventions: A Systematic Review



open access

The median percentage of published documents with adverse events information was 46% compared to 95% in the corresponding unpublished documents. There was a similar pattern with unmatched studies, for which 43% of published studies contained adverse events information compared to 83% of unpublished studies.

Why Was This Study Done?

  • Research on medical treatments provides information on the efficacy of such treatments, and on side effects.
  • The balance between efficacy and side effects is important in assessing the overall benefit of a new treatment.
  • How much information on the side effects of medical treatments that is currently not published in journal articles is not known.

What Do These Findings Mean?

  • These findings suggest that researchers should search beyond journal publications for information on side effects of treatments.
  • These findings also support the need for the drug industry to release full data on side effects so that a complete picture can be given to health professionals, policy makers, and patients.

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