(Lynch Syndrome/microsatellite instability eg. MSI-H) DNA repeat stretches tied to cancer progression and survival | UW HSNewsBeat Ovarian Cancer and Us OVARIAN CANCER and US Ovarian Cancer and Us

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Friday, October 07, 2016

(Lynch Syndrome/microsatellite instability eg. MSI-H) DNA repeat stretches tied to cancer progression and survival | UW HSNewsBeat



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The team used a new technique to analyze sequences of all the genes from nearly 6,000 tumors from 18 different kinds of cancer. The researchers obtained the sequencing information from a massive genome database storehouse called The Cancer Genome Atlas. Their technique and the availabily of this atlas allowed them to examine more than 200,000 microsatellite sites in many different cancer types.
They found that most cancer types had examples of tumors with microsatellite instability. They also learned that different cancer types had distinct patterns of mutation across their microsatellites. Over half of the microsatellite instability sites they uncovered were within or near so-called “cancer genes” — genes that that are implicated in cancer development and progression. This finding suggests the microsatellite mutations may be causing these genes to malfunction.
 The researchers also observed a paradox: patients who had tumors with comparatively more unstable microsatellite sites tended to survive longer.
Salipante and his colleagues hypothesize that cancers cells with relatively high numbers of microsatellite instability events are producing more mutated proteins of all kinds, not just cancer genes.  These mutated proteins draw the attention of the immune system and trigger immune attacks that slow tumor progression.

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