Feasibility and outcome of interval debulking surgery (IDS) after carboplatin-paclitaxel-bevacizumab (CPB) Ovarian Cancer and Us OVARIAN CANCER and US Ovarian Cancer and Us

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Tuesday, December 20, 2016

Feasibility and outcome of interval debulking surgery (IDS) after carboplatin-paclitaxel-bevacizumab (CPB)



abstract:
Feasibility and outcome of interval debulking surgery (IDS) after carboplatin-paclitaxel-bevacizumab (CPB): A subgroup analysis of the MITO-16A-MaNGO OV2A phase 4 trial

Highlights

20% of patients underwent IDS in a large non-randomized trial, in Italy.
86.5% of the patients had residual disease ≤ 1 cm and 63.5% had no residual.
27 patients (38%) had the intervention complicated by, at least, one adverse event.

Background

Few data are available on the outcome of surgery after a bevacizumab-containing regimen. The MITO 16A- MaNGO OV2A phase 4 trial evaluates the outcomes of first-line CPB in a clinical-practice-like setting. Here we present the results of the subgroup of patients undergoing IDS after neoadjuvant treatment or suboptimal primary surgery.

Methods

400 chemona├»ve epithelial ovarian cancer patients, age ≥ 18, ECOG PS 0–2 were eligible to receive C (AUC 5 d1, q21) plus P (175 mg/m2 d1, q21) and B (15 mg/kg d1 q21) for 6 cycles followed by B maintenance until cycle 22nd.

Results

79 patients (20%) underwent IDS. Overall, 74 patients received at least one administration of B before IDS. Median age was 61.2, 70% of the patients had FIGO IIIC disease. The median number of cycles before IDS was 3 both for chemotherapy and bevacizumab respectively. A residual disease ≤ 1 cm was achieved in 64 patients (86.5%). Four percent of the patients experienced fever and 4% required blood transfusion after surgery. Surgical wound infection and/or dehiscence, pelvic abscess, intestinal sub-occlusion and fistula were experienced by one patient each.

Conclusions

In the MITO16A-MaNGO OV2A phase 4 trial, combined chemotherapy and bevacizumab did not hamper IDS and the rate of perioperative complications was similar to what expected without bevacizumab. These data support the hypothesis that adding bevacizumab to first line chemotherapy for ovarian cancer might not be denied to patients for whom IDS is planned.

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