OA: Response of BRCA1-mutated gallbladder cancer to olaparib: A case report (China) Ovarian Cancer and Us OVARIAN CANCER and US Ovarian Cancer and Us

Blog Archives: Nov 2004 - present

#ovariancancers



Special items: Ovarian Cancer and Us blog best viewed in Firefox

Search This Blog

Monday, January 02, 2017

OA: Response of BRCA1-mutated gallbladder cancer to olaparib: A case report (China)



abstract Response of BRCA1-mutated gallbladder cancer to olaparib: A case report

 Gallbladder cancer (GBC), although considered as a relatively rare malignancy, is the most common neoplasm of the biliary tract system. The late diagnosis and abysmal prognosis present challenges to treatment. The overall 5-year survival rate for metastatic GBC patients is extremely low. BRCA1 and BRCA2 are the breast cancer susceptibility genes and their mutation carriers are at a high risk for cancer development, both in men and women. Olaparib, an oral poly ADP-ribose polymerase inhibitor, has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration and the European Commission for the treatment of ovarian cancer with any BRCA1/2 mutations. The first case of a BRCA1-mutated GBC patient who responded to olaparib treatment is reported here.

open access - full report 




http://www.wjgnet.com/1007-9327/full/v22/i46/10254.htm
 
INTRODUCTION
Gallbladder cancer (GBC) derives from the mucosal epithelial lining of the gallbladder and the cystic duct. It is a relatively rare malignancy, but is the most frequent malignant neoplasm of the biliary tract system. Epidemiological studies have demonstrated that the incidence of GBC is characterized by remarkable geographic distribution and ethnic disparities. The incidence is extraordinarily high in American Indians, elevated in Southeast Asia and quite low elsewhere in the Americas[1]. Although GBC limits in Southeast Asia, with increasing global migration, the incidence is also increasing in the west, and spreads worldwide. The prognosis of GBC is dismal and the median survival for locally advanced GBC with non-surgical treatment is about 8 mo[2]. Some patients detected incidentally during routine cholecystectomy for cholelithiasis have a long-term survival, but they only account for 2% of all cases with GBC[3]......

0 comments :

Post a Comment

Your comments?